Evidence Exchange of LGBT Statistics

Welcome to LGBT Foundation’s Evidence Exchange, an evidence base of statistics about lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) needs and experiences.

Topics range from healthcare to homophobia and schools to safer sex. The evidence base is continuously updated to include new research, and all records include as much information about the statistic as possible.

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Young LGB participants (under 22) were much more likely to report personally experiencing homophobia.

Topics:
Discrimination: Other

Year: 2016

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More than a quarter of straight males had personally been the target of homophobia in sport.

Topics:
Discrimination: Other

Year: 2016

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More than a quarter of bisexual women had personally experienced homophobia in sport.

Topics:
Discrimination: Other, Other

Year: 2016

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Nearly half of lesbians had personally experienced homophobia in sport.

Topics:
Discrimination: Other

Year: 2016

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Nearly two thirds of bisexual men had personally experienced homophobia in sport

Topics:
Discrimination: Other

Year: 2016

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More than half of gay men had personally experienced homophobia in sport

Topics:
Discrimination: Other

Year: 2016

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82% of LGB participants said they have witnessed or experienced homophobia in sport

Topics:
Discrimination: Other, Other

Year: 2016

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Despite documenting some of the most severe forms of violence, of the 24 participants only 5 had made contact with the police. It must be noted here that only in one case were the police contacted directly by the survivor / victim; in all other instances they were contacted by a family member or a neighbour, usually after a particularly violent incident took place. Four had been satisfied with the police response and felt they had taken the domestic abuse incident seriously and taken appropriate action. One woman expressed dissatisfaction and believed that her trans identity influenced how the incident was investigated and handled.

Topics:
Crime: Domestic Abuse, Domestic Abuse

Year: 2016

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In line with previous research, friends and family were those most often spoken to about their abusive relationships, while only six survivors eventually sought counselling or turned to specialist domestic abuse services for help.

Topics:
Crime: Domestic Abuse

Year: 2016

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A few women spoke of self-harming, cutting themselves, as a means to try and control the emotional pain, and seven respondents, three of them trans women, indicated that they had attempted suicide

Topics:
Physical Health: Suicide & Self Harm

Year: 2016

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Seventeen respondents (almost 71%) in our study described suffering severe and frequent physical violence at the hands of their partners. Nine women disclosed suffering at least one serious injury that required medical attention, and six spoke of multiple injuries (broken bones, head injuries, knife wounds).

Topics:
Crime: Domestic Abuse

Year: 2016

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20 women in the sample (83 %) disclosed being subjected to recurring verbal aggression which most often consisted of insults, raging fits, intimidation in private places and name calling, all which left most of the respondents feeling ‘scared’, ‘helpless’, ‘ugly’ and / or ‘inadequate’. Other forms of controlling behaviour disclosed by respondents were financial control and limiting access to family, friends or LGBT friendly spaces (gay bars, LGBT groups and organisations…).

Topics:
Crime: Domestic Abuse

Year: 2016

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Intimate partnership abuse in same-sex relationships is as common as in heterosexual ones; occurring in approximately 25% to 50% of relationships. Research with transgender communities further suggests that the prevalence rates for those identifying as transgender and experiencing partner abuse may even be higher than any other section of the population.

Topics:
Crime: Domestic Abuse

Year: 2016

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A 2011 national survey of 6,861 gay, bisexual and/or transgender men shows 49% of respondents have experienced at least one incident of domestic abuse from a family member or partner since the age of 16 due to their sexual orientation or gender identity / expression.

Topics:
Discrimination: Domestic Abuse

Year: 2016

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A 2012 survey of 1,614 LGB and/or T young people aged 11-19 from England, Scotland and Wales shows that more than 55% experience homophobic bullying in Britain’s schools. Ninety-six percent of gay pupils hear homophobic remarks such as ‘poof’ or ‘lezza’ used in school while almost all (99%) hear phrases such as ‘that’s so gay’ or ‘you’re so gay’.

Topics:
Discrimination: Bullying

Year: 2016

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In 1983 half (50%) of the public said that 'sexual relations between two adults of the same sex' were 'always wrong'. At that time, only 17% thought homosexuality was 'not wrong at all'. In 2013 these proportions are more or less reversed; only 22% think that same-sex relationships are 'always wrong' while 47% say they are 'not wrong at all'.

Topics:
Discrimination: Other

Year: 2016

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The majority (64.7%) of [trans] respondents have awareness of the services that police, the Crown Prosecution Service and Witness Care services could provide.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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The majority (65.9%) of [trans] respondents answered that they would consider the use of a third-party reporting mechanism to report hate crime, which indicates a knowledge of third-party reporting and a level of confidence in their use/worth.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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Only 25.7% replied that they would be concerned about family becoming aware of their trans status [as a result of reporting a hate crime to police], this could be because the majority of respondents are open with their family about their identity. This could also reflect that most of the respondents were transsexual rather than transvestite, who tend to be more secretive about their trans identity.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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Just under half (47.56%) of the [trans] respondents felt that they were treated with respect on the initial contact [with police]. In 2013 when the same question was posed 74.2% of respondents replied that they were treated with respect, which represents a significant drop.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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The majority (77.1%) of respondents stated that confidentiality with regard to their trans status was important [when dealing with police].

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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Only a small number of respondents (15.38%) felt that the officer [who handled their hate crime report] had an understanding or knowledge of trans issues.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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The majority of [trans] respondents (74.2%) felt like they were treated respectfully by the police. This is a similar figure to the general perception of victims of crime.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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Of the respondents who had contacted the police about a hate crime or incident, there was a similar split between yes (23.08%) and no (21.79%) as to whether the hate motivation had been acknowledged. This prompts the question of whether police officers recognise a trans hate crime/incident adequately, and when it is identified is this explained to the victim.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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71.4% of the [trans] respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied with the initial contact with police, this is a very similar figure to the victim satisfaction figures with regard to all hate crime victims. However, it is lower than satisfaction rates for theft offences which are around 80%. On the reverse, 28.6% respondents were either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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The majority of the respondents (nearly 70%) who had been a victim, never reported the incident to the police. This backs up the perception that trans hate crime is vastly underreported.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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The results show that the majority of [trans] respondents did not know the offender, but nearly 30% did know who the perpetrator of the hate crime was.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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Overwhelmingly (91.2%) the respondents answered that they felt they were targeted due to their trans status or appearance.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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The results show around a 26% increase in [trans] respondents suffering from hate from 2013.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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The respondents overwhelmingly answered that they had been subject to verbal abuse (70.4%) when suffering from hate crime. This evidences the previous anecdotal accounts, and shows the link of hate crime to incidents of anti-social behaviour or the so-called “low level” abuse suffered by victims of trans hate crime.

Topics:
Discrimination: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime
Crime: Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime, Hate Crime

Year: 2016

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